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Artemis

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Artemis
Artemis
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General Info
Title(s) Goddess of the Hunt and Wilderness
Greek Ἄρτεμις
Consort None
Parents Zeus and Leto
Sibling(s) Apollo
Children None
Roman Equivalent Diana

Artemis (Greek: nominative: Ἄρτεμις; genitive: Ἀρτέμιδος) is the Greek goddess of the moon, hunting and wilderness. She is the daughter of Zeus and Leto, as well as the twin sister of Apollo. She is one of the three virgin goddesses of Olympus.[1]

In MythologyEdit

Artemis loved to hunt and then bathe in a quiet pool. If any man saw her bathing, she would seduce, and then drown them; for no man shall live to tell the tale. She has a group of young women called the Hunters, that have sworn loyalty to Artemis, and given up love, in return for immortality. This immortality does not, however, include death by battle. She is believed to have accidently fallen in love with, and subsequently killed, the hero Orion during hunting.

There are many instances where a man was punished for seeing Artemis bathe. In one story, a hunter comes upon her bathing in a river. He falls in love with her and thinks he can win her over if he is respectful and tells her how great a hunter he is. He comes out of the forest and calls to her, and introduces himself. He tells her he loves her, and must have her for a wife. Artemis, smiling, tells him no man will ever have her, and turns him into a spotted deer. His hunting hounds smell him and, not realising he is their master, chase him down and tear him to pieces. In another story, an old man sees her bathe, but fearing the gods he falls to his knees and begs for forgiveness. Artemis blinds him, as punishment, but takes pity on him and gives him bird companions that follow him and act as his eyes.

GalleryEdit

In Popular CultureEdit

See Also Edit

Citations Edit

  1. (Hamilton 1998, p. 31)

References Edit


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